Smelling A Lemon Makes You Thinner, While Vanilla Makes You Feel Fatter.

People who sniffed a lemon felt thinner, lighter, and better about their body. And smelling the scent of Vanilla makes you feel heavier.

Lemon, Vanilla, Lemon Benefits, HealthWeigh Loss, Smell of a lemon, Bodyshape, Human-Computer Interaction,
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Lemon is one of the few that are omnipresent in all the kitchens and can be consumed in various forms. Lemon adds a distinct zingy flavour and a refreshing tinge in any dish or drinks it is added to. Salads, curries, iced tea or plain olf lemon soda water, lemon’s uses in the culinary world are unlimited. Adding to the already expansive list of lemon’s benefits, here’s another interesting fact about lemon you probably didn’t know. Lemon is already prized for its ability to bring about weight loss. And, even before you start to sip a glass of lemon water or pick fork to dig into a lemon-based meal, you might not realize that lemon already started its job to make you feel lighter the moment you took a whiff of your drink or meal.

According to the study:

Lemon, Vanilla, Lemon Benefits, HealthWeigh Loss, Smell of a lemon, Bodyshape, Human-Computer Interaction,
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A new study at the University of Sussex in England found that smelling a lemon makes us feel thinner, and ups our self-esteem, even though it doesn’t actually makes us lose weight. People who sniffed a lemon felt thinner, lighter, and better about their body. And smelling the scent of Vanilla makes you feel heavier. It made them feel heavier and more out of shape than they really were. Study shows how the sense of smell can influence the image we have in the mind of our body and on the feelings and emotions towards it. Several previous studies have shown our sense-including smell- affect our experiences and emotions.

For the analysis, two experiments had been carried out utilizing the perfume of lemon in addition to vanilla.

  • In the primary, examine, members sat at a pc display whereas olfactory stimuli had been delivered and had been then requested to charge the perceived scent utilizing a Visual Analogue Scale evaluating it to various kind of physique silhouettes.
  • In the second examine, members had been requested to stroll on the spot whereas olfactory stimuli had been launches after which requested to regulate the dimensions of a Three-D avatar utilizing a physique visualization device-based on their notion of themselves.

Also Read: Triphala: A Natural Ayurvedic Medicine Which Help You To Lose Weight In One Month

According to the researchers:

The researchers discovered that scents are able to change how people perceive their body image. While having odors wafted under their nose, participants created an avatar of themselves that they felt represented their own size-with varying results.  Experts also found that odors could be worked into wearable devices-such as ‘interactive clothes’- to boost people’s self-esteem in daily life. They also said the findings hold promise for a new treatment for patients with body dysmorphic issues, preventing eating disorders in the process. Researchers suggest that an estimated 30 million in the US and up to 3.4 million people in the UK suffer from an eating disorder.

One of the first-year Ph.D. students at the lab of the University of Sussex said: ‘Our brain holds several mental models of one’s own body appearance which are necessary for successful interactions with the environment. These body perceptions are continuously updated in response to sensory inputs receives from outside and inside the body.’ For example, smells can be categorized as pleasant, calming, or arousing. And researchers have also shown that lemon and pepper are associated with spiky shapes, while raspberry and vanilla with rounded ones.

Twenty-two participants were instructed to walk on the spot while scents were released and then asked to adjust the size of an avatar on-screen according to their perception of their body size. They were wearing headphones that delivered an enhanced sound of their own footsteps, recorded using special shoes. Researchers found that the scent of lemon resulted in participants feeling lighter, while the vanilla scent made them feel heavier. When a high-pitched sound was played with the lemon scent, participants felt even lighter. When low-pitched sounds accompanied vanilla scents, they felt heavier even more-so.

The findings were unveiled at the 17th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction on September 4 and yet to be published. Ms. Brainza said: “Being able to positively influence this perception through technology could lead to novel and more effective therapies or the development of interactive clothes and wearable technology that could use scent to enhance people’s self-confidence and recalibrate distorted feelings of body weight.”  Dr. Ana Tajadura-Jimenez, a co-author from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, said:  ‘Our previous research has shown how sound can be used to alter body perception.

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